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I just wanted to share a quick tip that I think is easily overlooked... invest in your community! And not just one. I have to say a lot of our success comes from the local community who have seen our name at the local booster clubs, fundraisers, sponsorships, etc. Don't count out your local chamber or commerce either. Host get-togethers/business functions at our shop, get a little league banner, run a "contest" if you will that will benefit the local food bank. Get involved! You will be better known around the community if you do. It has helped us grow so quickly these last couple of years. I rarely say no to a sponsorship and it has paid off in the end. Here is one of the last community sponsorships we did. We tied it into our local "best of" contest that we have in town: Best Auto Body Shop in Orangevale

 

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