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Joe Marconi

Shop Owners; Take time to recharge this weekend

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There's a time to work, and there's a time to relax a bit. We are in the middle of a three- day weekend; Labor Day. The very name Labor Day should make us all think about how hard we work all year long.  We need balance in our lives. We need time with friends and family.  So, take a break and recharge your batteries this holiday weekend. It will do you a world of good.  Trust me, the business will be there after the weekend is over. 

Happy Labor Day Weekend!

 

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