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Our industry has many shop owners well into their 60s and 70s, some even older.  For many, they have taken a secondary role and have handed the business off to a younger family member. For others, they know that there are more years behind them then in front of them and planning their exit plan or succession plan.

A question for all the senior shop owners out there.  What are your plans for future?  Sell the business? Keep it in the family? Continue to work as long as your can?  Or something else?

 

 

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