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Junior

Laser pointer on Wheel balancer

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I have an older coats wheel balancer. Works great and is accurate. The problem is that on modern car 19-22" wheels it becomes really hard to eyeball the correct place on the wheel for the weight. Extra spins become common because the last weight was a few degrees off the mark. Newer balancers have laser pointers that make it easy. Has anyone retrofitted a pointer to their older balancer? Did you buy a kit or did you build something? I've done some searching but I can't find anyone that's done this before. I feel like it would be really handy.

 

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