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2005 Chevy Astro 4.3L - Int No Start.

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We are stumped on this one. This van was limped to us by the customer who tried to fix it himself. Truck was skipping and barely running.
We shimmed the new crank sensor. Reset the distributor (it was off 2 teeth). We repaired the common ground issue this vehicle has. Changed the dist. cap and rotor with Eclin parts.
Truck ran great for one day. Day 2 it was limped back to our shop. We found that we had to cycle the key to get the fuel pressure up. We replaced the clogged fuel filter. Truck still wouldn't start because of no spark.
We changed the ignition module and the truck started and ran fine for a little bit. The tech noticed that the voltage gauge was pinned in the red. We assume the high voltage cooked the module.
Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.

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