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sweitzerperformance

Operations Manuals, Employee Handbooks.

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Hey everyone, First I must say thank you to those of you that have taken the time to help me work through many of my startup issues! I'm still quite a ways off, about 8 months, but the future looks bright!

 

Anyway, its time for me to start writing employee handbooks and a shop operations manual. I have a few templates, but they are pretty general. I know a lot of the "my shop specific" items I want in these, but a lot of the cookie-cutter type tasks and items I'm sure I will forget trying to write the entire document from scratch.

 

Would any of you be willing to share these documents for your shop with me? I would very much appreciate you all's help!

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