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mspecperformance

Marketing Plan for a second location, Thoughts?

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For those of you members that have multi locations or have thought of opening other stores I'd like to open up a discussion on a proper marketing plan. Getting a new location off the ground can be challenging and it can also be what makes or breaks you. Here are some of my thoughts. To preface, these ideas are for opening an additional location under the same brand/banner.

 

 

1. Website. Piggy backing off your current website would be ideal. Make sure your SEO is top notch.

 

2. Direct Mail. Sending out campaigns 3 months prior to opening the doors. This can be expensive however exposure to greatest number of people in the short period of time is important.

 

3. Sending out an e-mail blast your current customers. It is in my opinion it is always a good idea to show customers how prosperous you are. By opening a second location it is a clear cut message that you are here to stay. Depending on how far your additional location is, you can offer some sort of special offer to new customers exclusive to your current customers. Also some sort of incentive to spread the news.

 

4. Signage and banners. Depending on how busy your location is in regards to foot and car traffic, it may make sense to hang a sign and/or banner to indicate you are coming to the neighborhood.

 

5. Get involved in community events early. Making your presence known in the immediate community can pay dividends for your brand awareness.

 

 

 

Feel free to expand or add new ideas!

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