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Techs and business cards

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Should techs be allowed to hand out business cards? Where I work we do/can hand them out. I have my own which have the business name on them, all my certifications and licenses along with the business phone number not mine personal number. When I hand out my card I always give the customer my Service writers card first and tell them that is who they will be contacting and then I give them my card.

 

I have come across the other "techs" cards (none of which are certified or have any licenses) one has the station name, his name followed by certified technician . On his card he has the ASE certified logo and then just his personal cell phone number. He is not certified nor does he have the stations number on it. The other guys card has the station name, his name followed by Technician specialized in all automotive repair. Followed by his cell number, the station number no where to be found on the card. This guy is very young has no training or schooling in fact is the first guys helper so to speak, he has a uniform but is paid by the other "tech" as his helper. Which in my mind brings up a whole other set of problems possibly legal, but I won't get into that.

 

Any way my thoughts are that these cards they are handing out are a conflict of interest and should not be allowed by any means and if continued the employee should be cut loose. What are you thoughts on business cards, mine are as such .. The way I have my card and hand the customer the service writers card first, I think is acceptable, or have the owner make the business cards for the "techs" with the information that he feels should be on the cards. I don't see a problem handing out the cards as long as the business's name and number is prominent on the card and the techs number is not on the card at all, and his or her qualifications can be and should be on the card. I also think that the service writers card needs to be handed out by the tech along with his or her card.

 

What are you practices or thoughts on the matter of business cards?

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