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Gonzo
Gonzo

Lost and Found -- The game of hide and seek with tools

Lost and Found

How many times have you finished a job, watched the car drive off, and then started cleaning up your tools only to realize you’ve misplaced something? You’re pretty sure, but not completely sure the missing tool is under the hood or in the interior of the car that just drove off. If you’re lucky, you can call the customer and ask if they’ve found your missing tool. But, there are those occasions when a phone call or a complete search of the shop doesn’t yield any sign of the wandering tool. For the most part you can put that tool down as gone for good, lost to that place where wayward nuts, bolts, tools, and my arrant golf ball shots always end up. Yea, we all know that place, the “Lost and never to be found again!” place.

It’s not the only way I’ve lost tools in cars. There’s been many times some tool has gotten lodged in a hopeless retrieval area of the car. Like down between the fender and body line, or in some obscure area that would take hours just to get close enough to even see it again, let alone get it back. Once, while I was working under an old car the socket I was using popped off of the extension, and I watched it rattle around while banging off of one thing after another. It was spinning like a top by the time it made it to the flat surface of the center cross member where it then stood straight up, spun some more, and then like some cartoon character it vanished into a hole. The hole was not more than a thousandth of an inch bigger than the socket, but somehow it managed to fall so perfectly that it dropped straight in. And, of course, there was absolutely no way to get a magnet back down the hole because the oil pan was in the way, and no way to use an air nozzle to blow it to either end of the cross member, because both ends were welded shut. I never did get that socket back. So much for using a good socket on a cheap extension.

I’ve lost track of how much time I’ve wasted chasing down these elusive tools that like to play hide and seek. Not to mention the spattering of profanity that I’m sure to mutter while I’m trying to get an eyeball on some of these tools I’ve dropped down into unknown cavities of irretrievability. But, if you do get a glimpse of the stupid little gadget you dropped then it’s like playing the old “Operation” game to get the thing back out. I’ll use just about anything, including the extendable magnet wand or my long mechanic’s finger tool to slowly draw that &*$!* runaway tool back through the maze of hoses, wires, and other assorted engine parts.

Sometimes, it’s just a sound the nut, bolt, or tool makes while it’s playing pinball and falls through the engine bay or behind the dash that gets you rolling your eyeballs in dismay. Now, everything else about the job has to come to a complete halt, while you go on the old tool safari to find it. Tools are too expensive to leave them to fend for themselves behind the dash or tucked in a corner of the engine bay. At the end of the day, they need to be with their other brothers and sisters in the tool box. Besides, the tool truck won’t be back until next week and that particular socket might have been the only one that would fit into the area of the car you were working on.

On the other hand, how many times have you found a tool that some other poor soul couldn’t find after dropping it down in the engine? I’ve found wrenches stuck between the exhaust manifold and the engine block and assorted sockets laying in the intake valley. Sometimes I wonder how some of these misplaced tools end up in such bizarre places. I mean seriously, what did ya need with a 4 foot pry bar behind the dash? And, how did you get it there? I’ve found everything from cheap sockets to expensive micrometers buried in the depths of a car before. The thing is, if it wasn’t for doing some service work in that area of the car you’d probably never know there was a brand new socket hiding.

Flashlights are a commonly misplaced tool. Many years ago, when my dad helped out at the shop, he would use a flashlight for practically everything. This particular afternoon he was installing a new window motor. Being Dad, he was very meticulous as always. Every snap, clip, and screw had to be put back in its exact spot. Every tool was carefully laid out on a towel on his work table and accounted for after the job was done. He was also one who took great pride in keeping track of every tool; he never lost a tool. Well, at least that’s what he used to tell me. But, that day the one thing he forgot to account for was his flashlight. The car was long gone and all his hand tools were back in place in his tool box before he realized he couldn’t find his flashlight. Since he had this reputation for surviving the loss of any type of tool, he wasn’t about to mention a thing to me about it.

A year later the same customer came back for some other repair work, and while he was there he asked my dad, “Oh, and if ya got a minute could ya look at that driver’s door for me? Every now and then I hear a rattle in there.” Of course, good old Dad was more than happy to oblige his friend and customer. And, of course, after all this time he had totally forgotten about his missing flashlight... which he still hadn’t mentioned to me. After removing the door panel, he found the rattle alright. It was his flashlight and the switch was still on. Needless to say, his reputation for not losing a tool was still intact. Lucky guy.

I seldom get that lucky; usually when I lose a tool it’s gone for good. Sometimes I will occasionally find a tool that somebody else will lose under the hood. It kinda-sorta evens things out a bit. Ya never know where a lost tool will show up. For instance, every once in a while I’ll be on a road call to rescue a stranded customer, and as I walk up to their car I’ll keep my eye out on the side of the road for anything shiny, such as a wrench or screwdriver. Occasionally I’ll find one. Hey, I know how they got there. It didn’t fall off of a tool truck, nope... it’s a lost tool from someone else’s repair. I’ll accept that in exchange for the last tool that I lost. Maybe one of these days I’ll get ahead of the curve and collect more than I lose. Just wish more people would lose the good stuff rather than those cheap overseas tools I seem to find most often.

 

Lose one-find one, it happens.

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I bough a high intensity LED flash light for about $85 bucks, just to lose it in about two days. I was ticked, I am sure the customer that finds it will be please with it.

 

On another note, you left out the tools that for some reason tend to grow legs and leave the tool box on their own... Talking about that, an old oil rig guy told me to paint my tools pink and that problem would be solved, as that is how he was able to stop losing his tools out in the field. :)

 

pnkflslgt.jpg

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I bough a high intensity LED flash light for about $85 bucks, just to lose it in about two days. I was ticked, I am sure the customer that finds it will be please with it.

 

On another note, you left out the tools that for some reason tend to grow legs and leave the tool box on their own... Talking about that, an old oil rig guy told me to paint my tools pink and that problem would be solved, as that is how he was able to stop losing his tools out in the field. :)

 

pnkflslgt.jpg

Good idea. We had a car come in once with an exhaust rattle. What we found was a flashlight sitting on top of the catalytic converter. It was distorted from the heat but not melted to the converter. It couldn't fall off but it could bounce around. Strangest exhaust repair I ever had.

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The other day I handed one of my techs a wheel hub assembly for a car. He took it and went to work. Pretty soon I hear all this commotion in the shop of the two techs looking all over for something. They lost it. Still in the box and hunting all over the shop for the hub. 20 minutes wasted because when I handed the tech the box, he grabbed some tool from the bottom drawer of his tool box and set the box down in the drawer, closed the drawer and went about his work. He was absolutely positive the other tech took it just to mess with him or something.

 

Situations like this make me think it would be a worthwhile investment to install a 16 camera security system in my shop. Not really to worried about security, but it would be nice to be able to hit rewind and find where we lost tools and parts.

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Ha! This is my world. 8 am I make a fresh coffee, grab my cordless, and start in on a job. 8:05 I'm looking for my coffee. 8:07 I'm looking for my phone. 8:10 looking for my coffee again. 8:30 my tech finished my job I started (meaning I pulled the car inside) 8:45 I can't find my flashlight, phone or coffee. 9 am customer throws away a cup he found in the parking lot and hands me a cordless handset. 5pm i see a dim light on under a car outside. Lol.

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Ha! This is my world. 8 am I make a fresh coffee, grab my cordless, and start in on a job. 8:05 I'm looking for my coffee. 8:07 I'm looking for my phone. 8:10 looking for my coffee again. 8:30 my tech finished my job I started (meaning I pulled the car inside) 8:45 I can't find my flashlight, phone or coffee. 9 am customer throws away a cup he found in the parking lot and hands me a cordless handset. 5pm i see a dim light on under a car outside. Lol.

 

That is too funny and I have days I do the same thing!

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We had a guy that lost a socket, and like most, he figured it out at the end of the day. This tech was so cheap, he would not buy a replacement. About a year later, the car came back for repair. The socket was still on the car just where it was left...... on the bolt; it never came off during a year's worth of driving. The tech joked he didn't need to buy new tools, he just needed to wait for the car to come back.

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