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Robbie

Differential Fluid Exchange - What tool are you using?

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I'm looking for some kind of electric or pneumatic machine that will pump gear oil into differentials as well as fill up transfer cases and transmissions that have to be filled from underneath. Ideally, it would have a small reservoir that could be easily cleaned to switch between fluids and would have a small pump to pump the fluid up and into the diff/TC/Trans.

 

I've looked at some different fluid exchange machines - BG has a differential machine that might do the trick, and I've looked a couple of similar machines online. The problem I'm running into with the machines I've found are that the reservoirs are very large and aren't easily removed for cleaning. I would like to be able to fill up a differential with 75w-140 and then quickly clean the reservoir and use the same machine to put AutoTrak II into the transfer case.

 

Anybody have any experience with this or know of a good piece of equipment?

 

Thanks in advance.

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