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CAautogroup

Service Note Taking

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What kind of notes do you take while servicing or even before servicing a vehicle? Safety items only ( tires, lights, etc)? Fluid levels?

 

Do you short had any notes or any items of extreme importance? (CEL, ABS, TPMS)? For CELs do you write out the code and a short description?

 

For vehicles left for repairs, do you ask the customer to write out the problem they are experiencing in their own words and sign it?

 

Thanks in advance for all your thoughts and opinions.

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