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My wife will soon be coming into the shop to help with the counter work and to address some of the time managment issues. We've been using a folder system that pretty well handles our needs, a wall mounted folder holder for each step of our process. I've considered refining the workflow and trying to stream line the processes we use and I thought some of the more experienced owners/managers might be willing to have a conversation in regards to workflow, paperwork managment, and office managment. Whats worked for you, what hasn't worked. Do you have a process thats followed with every job? Such as drop off inspection with customer, write ro, get diag approval, begin work, etc etc.

Do you have a time frame that you try and keep each step at? For instance do you try and keep the initial inspection short to better manage time?

In this case she'll be communicating with the customers on walk in and phone basis and shes very nervous about her lack of technical knowledge but shes very well versed on our businesses operation. How can I help her with this?

Ive found that the experienced guys always tend to give advice that works. I really appreciate the input.

 

Sent from my SCH-I605 using Tapatalk 2

 

 

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