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Great, I went to use my IDS today to reprogram a Mazda PCM and no more Mazda with the new update. Apparently there has been a divorce between Ford and Mazda. Anybody run into this yet? Have any workarounds? Sounds like you will have to get a Mazda disc like I did on the Jaguar..... Uhhh

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