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JustTheBest

This is Record Breaking - and another 240% increase coming in less than 5 years!

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USA Today article (Friday September 27, 2019 by Nathan Borney - USA Today) shows that “the average age of cars and light trucks on U.S. roads reached an all time high of 11.8 years in 2018.”

P_20190929_083714.thumb.jpg.5f7afbe7c0763d5c3427173b47ca6708.jpg

The article goes on to claim... “By 2023, there will be about 84 million vehicles on the road that are at least 16 years old, reflecting a 240% increase from 35 million in 2002, according to IHS.”

P_20190929_084049-1.thumb.jpg.eb7961703f6421844711502fe6ceb52c.jpg

Are you getting your share?

There’s only 90 days left in 2019 and the market is changing. Sorry, it HAS changed. Are you ready? Do you have your plans laid out for marketing your shop in 2020? 

Auto Service Marketing - Fix Your Car Count FAST!

Hope this helps!

Matthew
"The Car Count FIxer"

P.S.: Join me on YouTube at Car Count Hackers! FREE Help to grow your Car Count, Income and Profit! 
P.P.S.: Like and Follow Car Count Hackers on Facebook
P.P.P.S.: Have you registered in my FREE Training? "How to Double Your Car Count in 89 Days"

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