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Shop Tools, Equipment Condition & Housekeeping


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I don't spend a lot of time working in the shop on a day to day basis, but do have to do some after hours services or jump in to help. The shop has a few sets of tools that have been placed around in the shop so you don't need to go looking when you need common tools. Yesterday doing a couple simple tire changes & I needed a pair of pliers they station should have 2 they had none I asked a mechanic he went across the room to go get one pair. I then use the machine to breakdown the tire & it wouldn't bust the bead, so I went to the other machine & it was the same way so I went to do it the manual way. Put it on the rim clamp of the first & it wouldn't close, so I went back to the second & I had to clean & oil so it would clamp. I head to balance & had to move tires that will be installed or had been taken off but had life left so we hung on to.  So a 30 min job took 45 min. I asked come in this morning & before I could ask or say anything I see one of the tire guys doing a car tire by hand, I asked you always do it that way & he said yes neither machine is working. I said I found that out last night & have called the repair guy but how come nobody said anything, I got the I don't know answer.  So my question is how does everyone handle the putting tools back, checking machines & notifying of needed repairs & even sweep the floor. Do you have a person with a checklist go to each station every night, sweep the floors every night. Just seems like we have everyone working right up to quitting time or after hate to push more but our running after tools stepping over tires & machines not working correctly is costing us. Just getting ideas of what has worked for others. Thanks

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Hi BNC173! I can feel your pain. Please understand, I don't know you - I don't know anything about you or your shop - nor do I know anything about your process for hiring, so please, please do not take any of this as a "personal" hit, okay? 

My first thought as I read through your post was "How were these people hired?" 

Now, I'm not going into any long rant about process and procedures - nor am I going to form any type of "attack" on you. After all, you get it - you just don't understand why everyone else doesn't.

It's sort of like when I talk to shop owners and they complain, telling me "All of my customers are too cheap!"

My only response - "Who attracted them?"

It's like going to a buffet restaurant and finding kids running around the place like it was a playground. It's not their fault. They came into this world ONLY knowing what somebody TAUGHT them. I lay the blame squarely on the parents. 

I remember being told specifically.... "If you do this - then THIS is going to happen!". No threats - just a healthy dose of fear instilled. 

So what's your process to hire? Got a pulse? Need a job? Can you change a tire? You're HIRED! 
That's not a process.

Then above that - who is established at your shop, who knows all the "details" - that works with the person on training? I'm betting there isn't anyone. 

Look, like I said, I don't know you and I am not blaming you. The only thing I am trying to bring out is that people don't know what to expect - unless YOU TELL THEM SPECIFICALLY. 

In your comment, you said...

On 9/5/2019 at 1:45 PM, BNC173 said:

So my question is how does everyone handle the putting tools back, checking machines & notifying of needed repairs & even sweep the floor. Do you have a person with a checklist go to each station every night, sweep the floors every night.

 It's got to be up to YOU to develop the program. And the only thing I can guarantee you is that whatever program you establish - you'll be changing and updating it on a regular basis. I promise. But nobody you hire is going to read your mind - and don't tell me that it's common sense, okay? Because it's not common to all. 

I hope this helps! I promise, I'm not taking a shot at you!

Matthew
"The Car Count Fixer"

P.S.: FREE Course - How to Double Your Car Count in 89 Days!
P.P.S.: Car Count Hackers on You Tube
P.P.P.S.: Like and Follow Car Count Hackers on Facebook

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      Maintaining adequate production levels is the responsibility of management to create the processes that will lead to high production while holding everyone accountable. 
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