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Anyone who uses all data manage online has seen the new "recommended jobs" which is associated with canned jobs. I'm curious how canned/pre-priced jobs effect your margins. For instance, we primarily work on pickups so my concern would be if I price a brake job for a 3500 Dodge it would leave the canned price to high for smaller vehicles. This does seem like a nice way to speed up the write up, I'd like hear how everyone else does this.

 

 

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