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mmotley

GX460 Transfer case fluid

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Just thought I might save someone some $$$ in the future. Do NOT put 75w90 in a GX460 transfer case. A GX470 is fine, but 460 takes a very specific fluid. One of the techs learned the hard way at the dealership when they first came out. Today, I got lucky enough and caught one of my techs draining the fluid in one and getting ready to fill with 75w90. No damage done, but still costs ~$75 a can (yup, they put it in a freaking soup can that is no where close to practical).

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