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Junior

BMW ISTA Diagnostic software

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Is anyone using ISTA? If you are, what version and have you had any trouble. I've spent days now with BMW support in Germany on getting this software to work. I've installed in on multiple different machines and had no luck. In version 3.48 I can't scroll through any documents, on version 3.49 (latest) all the documents are blank so you can't do anything. Support is hopeless. Am I the bad egg or is this common?

 

 

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