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    • Article: There's an App for that - - - The internet may solve the information issues, but a mechanic still has to make the repairs

      There’s an App for that               Technology has a way of surprising us all by surpassing itself over and over again.  One day you’re dialing a rotary phone wired to a land line, and the next we’re communicating between micro wave towers and satellites.  We now have the capability to talk to anyone anywhere on the planet with a small hand held device just as long as you’ve got a signal. But, talking isn’t enough for our modern world.  We want the ability to connect with everyone and every sort of business or hobby we can think of through our magic little smart phone for any reason and at any time we’d like. It could be for local or world news, maybe to keep in touch with friends across the country, or how to do something you’ve never done before.  Book a hotel room, find a new job, check the weather, the possibilities are endless.  The technology in our hands is by far more technically advanced than what was used for the Apollo space missions. Think about it, we sent men to the moon with less technology than what you have in your pocket right now. Looking at it in those terms makes me realize the depth and scope of this new technology, it’s truly amazing.          If it wasn’t for museums hardly anyone born lately would have any idea how life was before transistors. Something else to consider is that anyone born a decade ago has never known a world without a smart phone.  People born just a few decades earlier have never known a world without the internet.  Another decade more and those people have no concept as to how the world made it from day to day without a home computer. Going even further back before the home computer, a computer to those folks was this huge machine inside a climate controlled building with these big reals of magnetic tape spinning randomly around or large stacks of punch cards that zipped through a machine at lightning speeds.  Going back to the 30’s and 40’s, a small screen 2 way conversation wrist watches was only in the newspaper comic strips and something that might resemble a computer was only found on a sci-fi movie down at the Bijou.          Now, we not only communicate, but we can source information about anything you can think of right at our finger tips. Need to know the yardage at the golf course, there’s an app.  Want to know the ingredients of a chocolate cake, yep, there’s an app for it.  Can’t figure out how to fix your car, you got it… there’s an app for that too.  Wait a minute… Did I say fix your car with an app?  I thought car repair was some sort of highly skilled trade that took years to learn the proper techniques and even longer to be proficient at it? That’s right, the very same.          Anyone with a smart phone can be an expert in any field they would like to be an expert in, and it doesn’t take much to make a “You Tube” video on any subject, especially on how to fix your car, and with a little extra effort you too can make an App on car repair as well.  Some are developed, produced, and edited to a high standard and at a professional level.  Others, well I’m not sure any thought was put into the content, background, or the poor grammar they used.  Years before the internet a mechanic learned their trade by being in the trade, now we’ve got what are commonly referred to as “You Tube Mechanics”.  These are the guys who couldn’t repair much of anything without consulting a You Tube video or going to their favorite App and more than likely never considered going to a trade school or opening a repair manual to find reliable information. Even though the general rule of thumb in the business these days is not to follow a traditional apprentice program but to learn as you go doesn’t mean you won’t learn something from today’s method of watching videos or viewing Apps, it’s just how much knowledge is lost or passed up by not following in the footsteps of our seasoned master mechanics and learning the trade from their well callused hands.            I’ve got to admit, there are a lot of great Apps out there for the mechanic to have on their smart phone.  For example, OEM1stop or NATSF where all the manufacturers’ websites are listed. You can find an App for calculating the cylinder volume on an air cooled Volkswagen, or the alignment specifications for just about every car out there, to what type of headlamp fits a certain car.  It’s endless. Whatever information you need, chances are there’s an app or some sort of site for it.  But, with all this helpful wisdom an App can’t fix the car for you.  You still need somebody to get in there and make the repairs accurately.          It used to be (years ago) a car would come into the shop that a friend of a friend spent the weekend under the hood trying to solve their friends car woes. Then, along came the internet and the smart phone which brought a wealth of knowledge at their fingertips.  But, in the end, the car still has to limp into a repair shop for a mechanic to get it back on the road.  Take this typical internet repair that happens on any typical day at any typical repair shop in any typical town in the country.          The car comes in on the hook and before it’s even on the ground the mechanic notices parts dangling out from the bottom of the car. The repair order only states that it stopped on the customer while driving and that he had attempted to look at the problem himself.  Upon further investigation the dangling parts and the condition of the motor showed signs of someone trying to remove the timing belt.  The plastic cover had a crack from the top to the bottom and it just so happens to be one of those covers that secured various hoses and wires away from moving parts.  It was clear that somebody had tried to take it apart without knowing all that needs to be known on how to remove it. A few words were mumbled by the mechanic that we don’t need to repeat and a call was made to the owner. (On a smart phone of course)          The conversation started and ended with how he watched a video and downloaded an App that showed the timing marks.  The App had some great information on it, but the video lacked the complete step by step procedures. The kind of steps that a seasoned mechanic would do without thinking about. You know, checking for hidden bolts, or how you should always give a light tug before reaching for the prybar and damaging something. Things like, cleaning the surfaces before starting so that you’re less likely to miss a bolt or fastener or have a tool slip on the greasy surfaces, to name a few. But, the app didn’t mention any of that. Now the customer isn’t here just for a timing belt, but a new timing belt cover, a harmonic balancer that was mauled into a useless pile of metal because he didn’t have the correct removal tool, and to replace all the missing special timing belt cover bolts the owner let fall into his gravel driveway never to be found again. Not to mention, nothing has yet been properly diagnosed.          Maybe what the automotive field needs is an App that shows a consumer how to dial their smart phone and contact a professional mechanic before they attempt a DIY repair at home, in a gravel driveway, with off shore-poorly made tools, and no proper safety equipment.  All the while, trying to balance their cell phone on the edge of the fender watching a You Tube video from a source with no credentials showing their expertise or experience.          Yea, there ought-a be an App for that.           
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      By Gonzo, in AutoShopOwner Articles

      • 4 replies
      • 332 views
    • Would you be interested in a reliable temporary Manager for your vacation needs

      Just throwing a stone in lake to see what ripples. I did some searching and didn't find to much information. I am also intrigued about the idea due to several owner's continuing to contact me over the years after I have moved on, moved to another shop, moved to another state, etc. Just a preface... been in the automotive industry for roughly 13.5 years. Started young, fixed own cars, modified own cars, worked on neighbors cars, cousin's, friends, you name it. Began to be the "go-to" for everyone and everyone in my community, school, baseball team, etc until I went to college. I began searching in college and founded an explosive automotive car club at a highly accredited university, graduated with a major in business in 2008 (the recession people...) and found a difficult time finding jobs in my metropolitan area. After a few months and scratching my head thinking about how I couldn't pay student loans by just doing sidework in my backyard, I sold cars at a local dealership nearby. A year and a half later, I transitioned into the service department. That is when I found my hidden talent of reasoning, negotiating, persuading a customer into spending money on their 198X bucket, that the repair was 4 times the value of the car. It was then I began to learn the value into servicing your vehicle, how to be attentive and listen to your customers, learn the trigger points and motives that persuaded a customer into a sale and continued to refined those traits I had acquired. I was even a consultant for a short period of time for automotive repair shops and learned even greater value into how to drive customer sales and keep them coming back. I ran several shops across the city, from the mom and pops to the high volume gas stations to the full blown performance shops and certified AAA approved and NAPA approved auto shops. Every shop had their quirks and each shop was different in each and every way. But I adapted. I never had issues finding success at each of these shops and each experience was more satisfying in the end than anticipated. I moved one from certain shops due to low wages, long hours, extra long commutes, and my quest to fulfill the roll of a husband. My wife wanted to take up acting as a full blown career so I find myself in LA, just running another shop, making the owner tons of money and trying to figure out my next move in life. So I have to ask you this question. If you had a certified ASE C1 service writer that was willing to cover for you, from open to close for your small business, that you trusted to straight up pick the ball up and run with it, has extremely valuable knowledge of a technician yet is capable of selling a coloring book to blind man, is it something that you as an owner would be interested in for a right price for someone to keep your business open, fluidly moving for a week to two weeks, and be confident that this person would not just screw everything up? This isn't a "I will fix all of your problems in your shop" kind of ordeal. I just really understand how automotive repair works and have been in so many different situations and have been bored for quite some time now that I am looking for different opportunities to establish a career in not running my own fixed location but remotely helping your location when the help is needed. Now if you think I will come on board to dissect your business because you think I can help you run your business better? I absolutely can but that is not what I am looking for. I am interested in coming in as a "friend" to help out and run your shop privately so you can take that dream vacation to Maui and not have to sweat about the shop and what to do with your employees or that appointment for the coolant leak for Mrs. Robinson's cadillac after you replaced her water pump last week. I need a full 411 lowdown about the shop. It will involve some lengthy forms to fill out about liability and 1099 contractual employment and the fact that I will be an official representative of the business for that week or so. But it may give you the breath of fresh air that you have been looking for. I have done it for my previous bosses a few times and I plan on continuing to help him out when I have the time and am in a position to help. I still got contacted after being 3000 miles away and I am the first go-to guy in this situation because I am reliable, willing, and right man for the job. Some of you think I am crazy but I am certain that there is someone out there is desperately figuring out a way to take a few weeks off without having to close the shop and suffer a major loss in business. What are your thoughts? contact: [email protected] The following words are NOT foreign to me: Mitchell, Alldata, Shopkey, quickbooks, RO Writer, Reynolds, RepairPal, AAA, ASE Certified, warranty claims, write it right  

      By keemosaki, in Automotive Classifieds

        
      • 1 reply
      • 558 views
    • Thought this was funny !! saw it online

      😆 I am sure we all know a few "mechanics" that could wear this proudly . Personally  I hate You Tube mechanics, drives me up a wall to see guys trying to figure out car problems with it or even using google !

      By skm, in General Automotive Discussion

      • 9 replies
      • 569 views
    • Article: Building a Canoe - When you're deep in thought...

      Building a Canoe

      Have you ever noticed when you’re relaxing at home, or at work trying to accomplish something, sooner or later somebody comes along and asks, “So, whatcha doin’?” It happens to me all the time. Around my house though, there’s a typical answer you’ll get if you ask such a question, and that’s, “I’m building a canoe.” Meaning, “It’s not all that important what I was doing. Thanks for caring, but I’d like to get back to what I was doing.” It’s a running joke at my house. Nobody takes it seriously. It seems at my house, no matter what the situation is, somebody is building a canoe somewhere. Now at the shop, well, I’m not sure anyone would understand “building a canoe”, and it definitely wouldn’t be appropriate. But, I’ve certainly had my fair share of chances to shout it out from time to time.

      Take the typical phone call that asks, “If you’re not real busy right now, I’ve only got a couple of questions I’d like to ask.” Not a problem, nothing is as important as helping the next person in line. Go ahead and ask, but if the questions seem to be from the far side of the lake I might start answering with nautical terms or what size oars I’m carving out. By then, you’ll know I’m probably not following your line of questions too closely.

      Let’s face it, I’m just a mechanic. According to some, I’m supposed to have more in common with a Neanderthal than a rocket scientist. Figuratively speaking of course. But, at the same time, I’m supposed to have the solution for any type of problem at a moment’s notice, and know exactly the cost of each and every part from each and every manufacturer cataloged in my brain, and if I can’t answer their question with the answer they expected I must either be a Neanderthal, or I’ve spent way too much time building canoes and not on my chosen profession.

      It goes back to the old school of thought that it doesn’t take a lot of brain cells to do this job. I’m not sure where that comes from, or how it ever got started. But, if you’ve watched a few old TV shows from the 50’s and 60’s it’s pretty clear that the portrayal of a mechanic is almost always one of a dopy guy with a greasy rag hanging out of his pocket who couldn’t hold an intelligent conversation with anything beyond a boat oar. That perception has gotta change, these days it takes a highly trained, technically savvy mechanic to diagnose and repair the modern car.

      Like many professional mechanics, I don’t spend my time under the hood of a car to answer questions. I’m there to do my job, and that’s fix the car. But, there are those occasions when one of those rubberneckers is leaning over the fender and you know at some point they’re going to ask, “Whatcha doing now?” I seriously want to break out into a long dissertation of how I’ve been building this canoe. It’s probably best I don’t paddle in that direction, as I’d have to explain the canoe thing.

      Being so involved in your work is one thing. Being asked questions while you’re working is another. Sometimes it’s not a problem, while other times it throws you so far off you’ve got to regroup your thoughts and start all over again. I’ve often wondered how a psychologist would interpret some of the things I hear at the shop. Maybe I really don’t want know, maybe I’m the crazy one and everyone else is just building their own canoes.

      A perfect example was a hot afternoon with several jobs going all at once. The shop was buzzing and everybody was super busy when this guy came to the service counter. “Ya got a second? OK, OK, like… I changed the starter, the battery, and the ignition switch. Then, I changed the window switch, all the relays, and the fuel pump. I was told it could be the power steering pump, so I changed that too, and while I was at it, me and a buddy replaced the heater core. So, so, how much do ya charge to look at my car?”

      For me, I prefer the logical approach to answering customer’s questions. That is to answer each and every one of their concerns correctly and professionally. But in this case, which end of the canoe are we talking about? I’m not quite sure what I was really asked. There I am just paddling along (working out in the shop), doing my thing, and when I pull up to the shore line (run up to the service counter) somebody starts telling me about what parts they changed on their car and not necessarily problems I’m capable of solving. Do I ask this guy, “I take it the car doesn’t start?” or do I answer the only question that I actually heard? Is there more than one canoe involved in this story, or have I been paddling on the wrong lake all this time?

      By now, I should have a whole fleet of canoes. But, I never ever seem to finish the first one, before I’m swept downstream on another adventure. There’s always another job, another phone call, and another, “Hey, do ya got a second to answer some questions?” Which usually leads to another canoe.
      Working on cars, and all this high tech razzle dazzle stuff can be a trying effort, but it’s what mechanics do every day. It’s one of those jobs that seems easy, but in reality, it’s not. It’s something that not everyone is cut out for. It has its rewards as well as its down sides. But for the most part it’s a great career choice and if you’re like me, finding and fixing the problems is what it’s all about. However, I wouldn’t mind building canoes as a career choice either. It’s another one of those jobs where working with your hands is the only way of getting things accomplished, and I’m definitely a hands on type of guy.

      We all could use a little more time to just float along and enjoy the gentle current and scenery. You know, take in the big picture for a change, and realize none of us really have it that bad after all. Maybe a little less of that rush-rush and hurry up-stay-on schedule in our lives. Mechanic or canoe builder, every trade has their issues. But, when the day is done, and we have that moment to sit back and forget about the shop or that next car we’ve got to work on, it’s the perfect time to day dream about a leisurely float down a lazy river. So, as you’re sitting there in your easy chair, smiling, taking in that imaginary scenery and somebody comes along and asks, “Whatcha doin’?” just tell them… “I’m building a canoe.” It’ll be our little secret.

      Click here to view the article

      By Gonzo, in AutoShopOwner Articles

      • 2 replies
      • 349 views
    • Yelp pay per click

      Good evening is anybody using the Yelp pay per click. If so how is it working.

      By Bockauto, in Marketing, Advertising, & Promoting

      • 13 replies
      • 1,597 views
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