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Joe Marconi

2004 Audi A6, Water Damage Destroys TCM

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From the last storm we had two 2004 Audi A6’s towed in. Both had water that leaked inside the car, soaked the rug and filled the interior with about 2 to 3 inches of water. The TCM (Transmission Control Module) sits in a well under the rug on the passenger side, front. The repair is to strip in interior; replace the rug and the TCM.

 

The cause for one of the Audi’s was a plugged water drain under the battery. It was clogged with leaves and debris. The water filled up the battery tray and worked its way past the firewall and into the car.

 

The other Audi had a window molding problem which did not seal the water from entering the cabin filter area, allowing water to pour down the heater/AC box, thru the blower motor.

 

I thought I would pass this info on…

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