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Why Elminating Waiting Appointments and Closing Saturday Changed My Business [RR 828]


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Transforming your business doesn't happen overnight, but it starts with committing to one small change. Recorded live at the 2023 Institute Summit, Anthony Bodine shares his remarkable journey of trusting his coach and how it changed his business.

Anthony Bodine, Protech Automotive Solutions, Johnston, RI.

Show Notes

  • You must understand your numbers.  Grew ARO from $287 to $800 with the help of coaching. You need somebody to hold you accountable. Trust the process and trust that what's the worst that can happen?
  • Commit to making small changes.
  • A big pivot in the business is getting a coach to change the things that hold your business back from making a profit.
  • Understanding KPI’s 
  • Big change in business- went from having waiting appointments to no waiting appointments. Closed Saturday’s
  • Have a success plan
  • Paying a premium for exceptional customer service- to feel important, to feel like your business matters. From a customer standpoint, what can they expect from our shop, and what should they expect?
  • Trust your employees; they have the brains, knowledge, ability, and moral compass to do the right thing. 
  • One of the most memorable things is when you take a situation where you've let somebody down and completely turn that around. 
  • Don’t compare yourself to other shops; compare yourself with where you were yesterday and last year.


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  • Have you checked out Joe's Latest Blog?

         0 comments
      It always amazes me when I hear about a technician who quits one repair shop to go work at another shop for less money. I know you have heard of this too, and you’ve probably asked yourself, “Can this be true? And Why?” The answer rests within the culture of the company. More specifically, the boss, manager, or a toxic work environment literally pushed the technician out the door.
      While money and benefits tend to attract people to a company, it won’t keep them there. When a technician begins to look over the fence for greener grass, that is usually a sign that something is wrong within the workplace. It also means that his or her heart is probably already gone. If the issue is not resolved, no amount of money will keep that technician for the long term. The heart is always the first to leave. The last thing that leaves is the technician’s toolbox.
      Shop owners: Focus more on employee retention than acquisition. This is not to say that you should not be constantly recruiting. You should. What it does means is that once you hire someone, your job isn’t over, that’s when it begins. Get to know your technicians. Build strong relationships. Have frequent one-on-ones. Engage in meaningful conversation. Find what truly motivates your technicians. You may be surprised that while money is a motivator, it’s usually not the prime motivator.
      One last thing; the cost of technician turnover can be financially devastating. It also affects shop morale. Do all you can to create a workplace where technicians feel they are respected, recognized, and know that their work contributes to the overall success of the company. This will lead to improved morale and team spirit. Remember, when you see a technician’s toolbox rolling out of the bay on its way to another shop, the heart was most likely gone long before that.
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