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[Podcast] Lift Safety with Rick White [RR 522]


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Rick White, President and Lead Coach for 180BIZ, an auto repair shop training and business coaching company. He also owned and managed several successful automotive repair shops.

Early in his career, Rick got his arm stuck under a vehicle while working underneath it. He managed to get out safely but it was a wake up call to him and for all of us as well. This is everyone’s concern. There are too many distractions like  cell phones, tablets, lackadaisical attitude of it never happening, not focused on job at task, talking to tech next to them and a whole lot more. We need to follow lift maintenance schedules religiously and document every procedure in order to check work properly.

Rick White’s Previous Episodes HERE.

Key Talking Points:

  • Lift safety- if you don’t talk about it and acknowledge it you are building risk
  • Rick read about a tech that got killed by car falling off lift onto him in Richmond Virginia
  • Last 18 months: 17 deaths from cars falling off lifts
  • Early in his career, Rick was working on a vehicle by himself on the ground, arm got stuck but was able to get out safely- wake up call from beginning   
  • Too many distractions- cell phones, tablets, lackadaisical attitude of it never happening, not focused on the job at task, talking to tech next to them
  • Customers are trusting you with their lives when they hand you the keys 
  • Need to implement an annual training program for everyone in the shop Autolift.org- certification program $16 per tech
  • Visually inspect lift contact point, lift car and wiggle to ensure it settles and isn’t moving, safety latches are on
  • Must follow maintenance schedule on lift- inspecting and checking fluids daily
  • Have procedures in place in order to double-check work- tire safety: have tech document torque and road test
  • If you get interrupted during job: document last thing you did on repair order/tablet etc then document what you were going to do nextWhen you get interrupted takes up to 20 minutes to get back into productive mode
  • Be engaged with NOW- “Carpe diem, quam minimum credula postero”Pluck the day- stop to pull some flowers, be present
  • Use a buddy system- do not work on a vehicle by yourself, have cameras
  • We work to live, we don’t live to work
  • Link for on-line lift certification:https://www.autolift.org/ali-store/lifting-it-right-online-edition/

Resources:

  • Thanks to Rick White for his contribution to the aftermarket’s premier podcast.
  • Link to the ‘BOOKS‘ page highlighting all books discussed in the podcast library HERE. Leaders are readers.
  • Love what we do, buy a cup of coffee HERE.

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Buy Carm a Cup of Coffee 

This episode is brought to you by AAPEX, the Automotive Aftermarket Products Expo. AAPEX represents the $740 billion global automotive aftermarket industry and has everything you need to stay ahead of the curve. With 2,500 exhibiting companies, you’ll see the latest products, parts, and technologies for your business. As a result, the event also offers advanced training for shop owners, technicians, warehouse distributors (WDs) and auto parts retailers, as well as networking opportunities to grow your business. AAPEX 2020 will take place Tuesday, Nov. 3 through Thursday, Nov. 5, 2020 at the Sands Expo in Las Vegas. Therefore, more than 48,000 targeted buyers are expected to attend, and approximately 162,000 automotive aftermarket professionals. They will be from 135 countries which are projected to be in Las Vegas during AAPEX 2020. For information, visit aapexshow.com

 

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  • Have you checked out Joe's Latest Blog?

         0 comments
      It always amazes me when I hear about a technician who quits one repair shop to go work at another shop for less money. I know you have heard of this too, and you’ve probably asked yourself, “Can this be true? And Why?” The answer rests within the culture of the company. More specifically, the boss, manager, or a toxic work environment literally pushed the technician out the door.
      While money and benefits tend to attract people to a company, it won’t keep them there. When a technician begins to look over the fence for greener grass, that is usually a sign that something is wrong within the workplace. It also means that his or her heart is probably already gone. If the issue is not resolved, no amount of money will keep that technician for the long term. The heart is always the first to leave. The last thing that leaves is the technician’s toolbox.
      Shop owners: Focus more on employee retention than acquisition. This is not to say that you should not be constantly recruiting. You should. What it does means is that once you hire someone, your job isn’t over, that’s when it begins. Get to know your technicians. Build strong relationships. Have frequent one-on-ones. Engage in meaningful conversation. Find what truly motivates your technicians. You may be surprised that while money is a motivator, it’s usually not the prime motivator.
      One last thing; the cost of technician turnover can be financially devastating. It also affects shop morale. Do all you can to create a workplace where technicians feel they are respected, recognized, and know that their work contributes to the overall success of the company. This will lead to improved morale and team spirit. Remember, when you see a technician’s toolbox rolling out of the bay on its way to another shop, the heart was most likely gone long before that.
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