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herm_g

OBD 24V to 12V Converter

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A friend of mine asked me if it is possible to use diagnostic scanner initially intended to test cars (12V) but with intended capability to test other vehicles be used to diagnosed truck (24V).

The idea is to use OBD 24V to 12V converter adapter (as photo shown) where the adapter to be plugged to truck DLC and the diagnostic scanner will be inserted into the adapter.


Are there any considerations of doing so?
What else could be the other usage of OBD 24V to 12V converter adapter?

Any advise would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.

 

24v to 12v converter.jpg

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