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I am owner financing the sell of my business and the new owner has 3 other shops that are smaller than mine. I have my insurance with Nationwide and they will only insure him if they get all 4 locations. Their concern is that he might shift employees around from location to location. I want him to have BOP insurance (Business Owners Policy) which covers the building and Liability. They are also going to consider this as non-owner occupied and don't like the fact that he sell used tires. The price they are giving us is almost 3 times what I was paying. My insurance agent says he can't find anyone else that will write the policy. Does anyone that sells some used tires have BOP insurance with someone other than Nationwide?

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