Quantcast
Jump to content

Shop Owners: Don’t Expect Your Employees to Leave Their Problems at Home


Joe Marconi

765 views

“Leave your problems at home” is a common expression. The thinking behind it is that if you are having a problem at home, it will affect your performance at work. So, change gears when you get to work and put the problem out of your mind.

However, can people just shut it off?  Can they leave their problems at home?  Consider this example; your technician and his wife have a very sick child who is getting worse. Their doctor is concerned and wants to refer the child to a specialist, fearing that something is seriously wrong. In this situation, do you truly expect your technician to shut it off, and simply put it out of his mind?

Problems at home are part of life. As a shop owner, you need to be more understanding and have empathy. You also need to build a solid relationship with your employees that allows them to approach you in times of need or crisis. This is a key component to building the right culture with high morale.

Here’s another scenario to think about: Let’s say your service advisor is overwhelmed at work. She is having a hard time keeping up with all the work and reaching the point of burnout. In addition, she works with a problem technician that is always complaining about something. Do you think this service advisor can shut off her work problems and not bring them home?

The bottom line is this; as shop owners, you need to reach your employees on an emotional level. Yes, you are running a business and you have your own set of issues and problems. I get that. But your success is directly related to the success of the people around you. That means that everyone must feel that they are people first, employees second.

The next time you see something off with one of your employees, don’t assume the worst. Pull them aside, show them you care, and ask if there is anything they need and if there is something that you can do to help.

  • Like 3

5 Comments


Recommended Comments

Good post, Joe. I would suggest a follow-up post covering the next step, the phase beyond empathy. What does the shop owner do next, how can they provide aid in various examples while not breaking the membrane between a business leader and team member. 

I feel many business owners naturally have empathetic responses, but also a healthy fear of "what's next" and for good reason. Mastering the next phase is where Culture is built. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
1 hour ago, Charlie said:

Good post, Joe. I would suggest a follow-up post covering the next step, the phase beyond empathy. What does the shop owner do next, how can they provide aid in various examples while not breaking the membrane between a business leader and team member. 

I feel many business owners naturally have empathetic responses, but also a healthy fear of "what's next" and for good reason. Mastering the next phase is where Culture is built. 

Charlie, I like the way you think, my friend! Thank you for the feedback!  

Link to comment

Very good read. Always stand by your employee's, we all have ups and downs and will always be there for them 110%. 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
11 hours ago, Gary Childs said:

Very good read. Always stand by your employee's, we all have ups and downs and will always be there for them 110%. 

 

Words of wisdom, Gary. Thank you for the feedback! 

Link to comment

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...