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  1. rpllib

    rpllib

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    Joe Marconi

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Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/25/2021 in all areas

  1. The right people performing consistently has certainly been a key to my ability to have a life, while owning my business. Some of that, I have to attribute to a healthy dose of good fortune, throughout my career, but especially early on(first 10 years). It was securing a single A tech (started as a C tech) and a service advisor , both with the right attitudes and right work ethic, and keeping them for 25 years plus, that has made the biggest difference for me. Others have come and gone, but having a core team through it all, made an immeasurable difference for me. This is especially noticeable
    2 points
  2. I raised ours $23/hr 4 months ago and gave the techs an $8 an hour raise. I think I was late to the party adjusting prices but we've gone up $50 an hour over the last year and a half. Customers haven't even noticed unless they are price shopping and those people will always find something cheaper anyway.
    1 point
  3. Frank, $10.00 is a great start! Just do the math to make sure, and if it is too low, raise slowly. There are shops that are adding a few dollars per month until they reach their desired labor rate goal. By the way, it's different around the country. In areas of New York, we I am from, we are seeing labor rates above $150 and higher, because of how much they are paying their techs. Good luck!
    1 point
  4. We have raised our rates by $10 in the last year but I may still be too low.
    1 point
  5. I've increased my labor rate by $20/hr yesterday. The main reason for doing this is to pay the best technicians what they are worth and maybe a bit more than that. Related, but a whole different beast is that I'm about to significantly increase my Quick Lube pricing. This one will be harder to implement as it's somewhat of a commodity with many other nearby competitors that may or may not follow. I've absorbed many COGS price increases without increasing the oil pricing in 4 years. My strategy is to let gasoline pricing hit $3/gallon (not there yet here in Texas... about $2.75/g
    1 point
  6. We certainly send people to the dealer for Warranty work, recalls and difficult jobs that need one-off specialty tools. I've generally felt uneasy doing the latter, but I like how you framed this.... "Let that frustration and expense be associated with the dealer as opposed to me." Thanks! We're still a startup, wrapping up year 4 in a few more months. As a manager, I've always believed that great people, hopefully people way smarter and more talented than me, are the key to success in any field. I've been in shops with these such tenured folks and was trying to figur
    1 point


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