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nge

Keeping up with Accounts Payable (Parts)

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Hey all,

 

Looking for some ideas on how everyone is managing their parts charge accounts. Specifically, how are you tracking your receivables and returns? Every order we make with our supplier comes with one page minimum, not counting if the part has a core charge, which is often times another page. We get a parts bill once every 2 weeks, when this comes we send back all of our returns for credit. My main concern is making sure we are getting all the credits for our returns/defects/cores. Our parts house leaves us a return book so that our service writer can fill out the slip as the parts are placed on our return shelf that way we know for sure they are getting written up correctly and we can make sure that a new part return isn't only getting returned as a core.

 

We are getting hundreds of slips of paper every 2 weeks and it is difficult to manage (this is just from our main supplier). When the invoice comes, we have RO #'s as our PO but even this doesn't help with returns because if there is an RO # it doesn't indicate if we received the wrong part and had to return it or if the customer calls and cancels the repair etc. I am just looking for a better way to track the bill that way when the invoice comes in I am not just paying it but instead comparing it with my totals and ensuring they match.

 

I know some shops that have someone who manages just their parts tickets full time but my shop is not set up that way and currently this is not a possibility.

 

Any ideas?

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