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Seems like lately we have been working out a lot of estimates without getting the job. Sometimes i feel like were wasting a lot of time to sit down and work these out.

Are we getting to detailed when doing this? I have learned to try and secure a appointment before giving a estimate, but that does not seem to work either. I'm not looking to land all the Customer's that call, but some would be nice!! More and more we are seeing people want to supply their own parts. In the past we never did this. Is it time to start thinking about changing how a CSP (customer supplied part) job is handled?

 

Looking for any thoughts

Thanks Jim Quinn

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Edited by rjbradlow

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