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This is my first thread, so please bare with me. I have now been a business owner for 1 full year and am loving it!!! Things are tight but I am finally at the point were it makes sense to bring in my first employee (tech). It has been difficult this past year wearing all the hats and I have found a guy that would be a great addition to the company. I will finally be able to move from maintaining the business to growing the business!!!

 

My question to everyone is what are the basic do's and don't with my situation? Is there anything fundamentally I should do or look out for? I am currently working on an employee handbook that will extend to all future employees. Everyone will have to sign and date that they have read and understand the contents. Would anyone have a copy of their handbook that they can send me to make sure I did not leave anything out of mine? It is overwhelming to write one of these from scratch. Especially since I am used to having a wrench in my hand, not a pen. I have looked into what is required to be in the book per the state, but i want to make sure that I am not missing anything that may pertain to our industry.

 

Thank you all in advance for your help!!! Best forum I have ever been to!!!

 

Dustin

AutoDR

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