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CAautogroup

How To Sell Add On Services

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I'd like other quick lubes opinion in regards to selling add on services with a basic oil change, since as well all know we rarely make a profit off just changing the oil and filter.

We currently are doing well with selling cabin and engine air filters simply by taking it out and showing the customer so they themselves can "make the sale" by just looking at the condition its in.

But how do you approach selling oil or chemical additives( engine stop leak, oil treatment, octane boosters)? Is it worth it to have in stock or will they just be another product collecting dust on the shelves? How would you price these items? And have you had any complaints from customers?

 

What other add on services do other quick lube and oil change shops have in mind?

 

 

 

 

Thanks for your thoughts.

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