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xrac

Rear Brake Noise Problem on a 2009 Avenger

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Friends here is the problem.

 

Last April we had a 2009 Dodge Avenger come in at 50,000 miles with the rear drum brakes destroyed. It needed shoes, drums and wheel cylinders from being driven pas metal to metal. We replaced the above but the problem since then has been a complaint with noise. We have installed three different brands of shoes including the premium Wagner and CarQuest shoes. We literally have tried every thing we know and we cannot see where the problem is. We are going to try dealer shoes but I am not optomistic. I have read about a similar issue on line but have not saw a solution posted. Has anyone on here ever experienced this problem.

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