Quantcast
Jump to content


    • You can post now and register later. Already registered? sign in now to post with your account.
    • ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

        Only 75 emoji are allowed.

      ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

      ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

      ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


      Once you submit your question, a new topic will be created for you in our forums. Our moderators may move your topic to a more suitable forum category if one exists. Members will see your topic and be able to respond to your question.

    • This will not be shown to other users.
Joe Marconi

Breaking My Own Rule

Recommended Posts

If I can avoid it, I will not give price over the phone for something I have no knowledge of and not checked out. If we tell a regular customer who is in for service that the timing belt needs to be replaced and she calls back to get a price, that’s a different story and those jobs are money in the bank. Why? They are already our customer and there is that trust/relationship factor. But to blindly give someone a price on something that we have not inspected, based on what they think they need, over the phone, just does not sit well with me.

 

The other day, an acquaintance through the Local Chamber of Commerce, called me for a price on a brake job for his Land Rover. Why someone who owns a Land Rover needs a price is another story. So, after a few questions and explaining to him the reasons why I should inspect the car prior to giving a price, he pleaded with me and I caved in and gave him an estimate. A few days later I called him and left a message and he has not returned my call. This happened once before with this guy when he needed a price on tires. He never came in for the tires either.

 

I do plan on speaking to him at the next chamber meeting. He owns a local pharmacy and I am going to politely ask him how he would feel if the next time I shop in his store I asked the price of his deodorant, toothpaste, cough drops, medications and other items BEFORE I purchase them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Similar Topics

    • By Joe Marconi
      For many of us, it's been a wild ride the past few months. We had to take care of everything, making tough decisions, dealing with banks and the SBA and running the shop from the trenches. But, with things looking better each day, it’s time that we get back into the role of building and operating the company. 
      For many, the COVID-19 crisis is far from over.  However, the sooner we begin to adjust and build for the future, the better off we will be.
      Shop Owners are among the hardest working people on the planet. We find ways to get through the most difficult situations. I have no doubt that the lesson’s learned from this crisis will make us stronger and more successful.
    • By BOYDS AUTO SERVICE
      Good evening, 
      Is anyone using 1st mile merchant services for CC processing?  They are partners of Mitchell 1 and seem to offer great rates and options. They also provide customer financing. I’m considering switching from my current processor but would like to hear real world experience before hand. 
    • By FROGFINDER
      Anybody offering vehicle pick up and drop off service at customers home or workplace? How is it going? 
    • By AutoShopOwner
      As a growing number of states issue emergency orders to close non-essential businesses, the U.S. government has issued guidance declaring that automotive repair and maintenance are “essential” functions.     
      A March 19 memo from the Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) includes automotive repair and maintenance employees in a list of “essential critical infrastructure workers.”
      “If you work in a critical infrastructure industry, as defined by the Department of Homeland Security, such as health care services and pharmaceutical and food supply, you have a special responsibility to maintain your normal work schedule,” CISA Director Christopher Krebs says in the memo.
      The list of essential critical infrastructure workers includes “employees who repair and maintain vehicles, aircraft, rail equipment, marine vessels and the equipment and infrastructure that enables operations that encompass movement of cargo and passengers,” as well as “employees supporting or enabling transportation functions, including truck drivers, bus drivers, dispatchers, maintenance and repair technicians, warehouse workers, truck stop and rest area workers, and workers that maintain and inspect infrastructure (including those that require cross-jurisdiction travel).”

      As a growing number of states issue emergency orders to close non-essential businesses, the U.S. government has issued guidance declaring that automotive repair and maintenance are “essential” functions.     
      A March 19 memo from the Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) includes automotive repair and maintenance employees in a list of “essential critical infrastructure workers.”
      “If you work in a critical infrastructure industry, as defined by the Department of Homeland Security, such as health care services and pharmaceutical and food supply, you have a special responsibility to maintain your normal work schedule,” CISA Director Christopher Krebs says in the memo.
      The list of essential critical infrastructure workers includes “employees who repair and maintain vehicles, aircraft, rail equipment, marine vessels and the equipment and infrastructure that enables operations that encompass movement of cargo and passengers,” as well as “employees supporting or enabling transportation functions, including truck drivers, bus drivers, dispatchers, maintenance and repair technicians, warehouse workers, truck stop and rest area workers, and workers that maintain and inspect infrastructure (including those that require cross-jurisdiction travel).”
      For additional information, contact Aaron Lowe, senior vice president, government and regulatory affairs, at [email protected] or Tom Tucker, director, state affairs, at [email protected]
      Source: https://www.counterman.com/automotive-repair-service-deemed-essential/
    • By Joe Marconi
      We all survive by and need healthy car counts. That's a given. But all too often I see auto repair shops with "steady" but not "growing" car counts, but with new customers coming in each week.
      So, the question is, "If a shop has steady car counts and has new customers each week, then why are car counts not growing?"  
      This is a topic that's complicated for a post but here are a few things to consider:
      Is your marketing attracting the right customer that matches your key profile customer? If not, the wrong customer may be a one-timer and that does not help your car count.  Or, if you are promoting too much discounting, you may be attracting the wrong customer, and that's not a long-term strategy either.  Are you making every effort to WOW all new customers and create an amazing experience that gives the new customer a compelling reason to return? All too often we are too transactional and don't spend enough time establishing relationships.  Make every effort to spend time with each customer and ESPECIALLY with first time customers. Its the relationship not salesmanship that builds a company! Are you booking your customer’s next vehicle appointment?  Please don’t tell me this does not work. It does!  Hairdressers do it, doctors do it, dentists do it, nail salons do it. My chimney cleaning service company evens books the next chimney cleaning!  If you are not booking your customer’s next visit, trust me, someone else will. I hope this makes sense. What are your thoughts? 


  • AutoShopOwner Sponsors



×
×
  • Create New...