Quantcast
Jump to content


    • You can post now and register later. Already registered? sign in now to post with your account.
    • ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

        Only 75 emoji are allowed.

      ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

      ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

      ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


      Once you submit your question, a new topic will be created for you in our forums. Our moderators may move your topic to a more suitable forum category if one exists. Members will see your topic and be able to respond to your question.

    • This will not be shown to other users.
Gonzo

Article: Have A Great Day --- Yea, there really are great days in the business, we just tend to dwell on the bad sometimes.

Recommended Posts

Have a Great Day

 

 

 

I've seen mechanics, service writers, (and me) get upset over the stupidest things. Everything from each other, customers, the wrong parts showing up, stubborn bolts that won't turn,to "Who used the A/C recovery machine last and didn't bother to fill it backup?!" Things happen, and sometimes we should just let it go, and not let it raise our blood pressure to the boiling point.

 

 

 

Sometimes it's best to remember those days when every repair and every customer situation went off without a hitch, and to remind ourselves there is a lot more of days like this than we care to admit. But, like a lot of hardened veterans of the wrench world we tend to see nothing but the gloomy side of the repair business. It's the car problems,or a few goofy explanations about those problems, and then we have to sort the mall out with logical explanations. This usually puts us (mechanics) in a mood where we tend to believe everyone around us must either be incompetent or lacks trust in our abilities. I wouldn't doubt that police officers,paramedics, or firemen develop a certain attitude when confronting the next traffic situation, drug dealer, or burning building. It's part of the make-up of the job. Not that anyone ever started out in their profession that way; it's something we all developed after years of experiences from countless situations.

 

 

 

Sometimes, it's a good idea to just take a step back, no matter what's going on, and just have a great day. Put a smile on that old mug and say thank you and good morning to everyone you meet. Take the time to say, "Hi, how are ya?" to the mail person, the guy in the next bay and so on. Maybe it's the little extra time you take to say, "And, how are you?" back to the teller at the bank drive up window when they greet you with their customary introduction.

 

 

 

Maybe spreading some of that old fashion common courtesy would be in order too. Opening the car door for the Mrs. or rushing to the restaurant door only to hold it open for the couple behind you. Some of us do all that and more without even thinking about it. But, there are many of us who need to be reminded about it. I fall in that category of; "needs to be reminded" more often than I'd care to admit. At times I do, and other times, I wish I would have thought to be more courteous before going on my own thoughtless way.

 

 

 

There are days at the shop when all the money in the world doesn't add up to the joy of doing a good job and the admiration from the customer. If I had to put it in other terms, it would be like an actor on stage. They do their craft for the applause at the end of their performance. That simple act of acknowledging a job well done makes all the difference in the world to them. Similar acknowledgments do happen at the automotive service counter as well just not in the same way. At least I haven't had a customer stand there and applaud over an oil change… yet, but they do show their appreciation in other ways, and quite often.

 

 

 

Over the years I've witnessed some of the generosity people have for their automotive repair person firsthand. From cookies and cakes brought in by an appreciative customer, to showing up announced just to say Hi. Once in a while it's tickets to a ball game,and others it's something they know I would probably would be interested in. I've even had a customer come in and present me with a handmade ball point pen. (Really cool pen by the way) and I've had an older gentleman bring my wife's flowers on her birthday. (Thanks for the reminder... I almost forgot that year.)

 

 

 

Ya just never know, obviously, we do touch our customer's personal lives with our efforts. And for that we should all be grateful. It's not the kind of thing you think of when you make the decision to go into the automotive repair business. It's something that happens because you are doing a good job in business and touching so many lives. Great customers are like my extended family,and I'm glad to call them a part of it. Maybe as the shop owner, the technician, or the service writer, maybe,we should all stop what we're doing and applaud our customers. They're the real stars of our world.

 

 

 

So, no matter the faults or misconceptions of car care, it's a good thing to be a part of it. Because, like a lot of us in the business of fixing cars even though we may not outwardly show it, we really do care. Yes, we need your business and your support;we appreciate it even though we may forget to say so. Sometimes we all need to be reminded of not what we do, but how much what we do effects everyone around us. So if you haven't already, now is a good time to start... mechanics, technicians, and everyone else out there.... Have A Great Day.

 

Click here to view the article

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Topics

    • By Joe Marconi
      The other day, a customer asked my service advisor, if he would price match a set of tires.  This customer got an online quote from the internet; a local TIre Store know for discouting tires. 
      My rule, I don't price match. My prices are competive and fair. 
      Would you price match just to get the job, and sacrifice profit?   Remember, no one really knows the true cost of any service or repair until the car is in the shop.  So, internet quotes are not set in stone.   
    • By AutoShopOwner
      RALEIGH, N.C.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Nov. 1, 2019-- Advance Auto Parts, Inc. (NYSE: AAP), a leading automotive aftermarket parts provider, has launched a new learning management system designed to provide training programs that grow an automotive professional’s knowledge and skills throughout their entire career. Advance regularly serves more than 26,000 individuals in North America each year with training courses offered through the company’s Carquest Technical Institute (CTI) and Worldpac Training Institute (WTI) programs.
      Training from Advance now combines courses available online and in the classroom from CTI+WTI into an integrated training solution, giving aftermarket professionals access to a robust library of technical training and business management education. Career Pathways, which feature a structured set of online and classroom events to establish mastery of technical and business competencies, are currently targeted to the General Service Technician and Professional Technician, with Senior Technician, Master Technician, and a number of specialist programs coming by the end of the year.
      “Delivering quality training is critical to addressing the technician shortage facing the automotive industry,” said Chris Chesney, Senior Director of Customer Training at Advance. “Integrating the expertise and curriculum of CTI+WTI into a centralized, easy-to-use platform enables Advance to go to market with an unrivaled training program. No matter what stage a person is in the life of their career, training is crucial to their long-term success.”
      Shop owners can track the progress of their technicians and staff through Career Pathways specific to the type of work they perform at their shop. Training participants receive certifications within the CTI+WTI platform as they complete training programs and advance in their career.
      “The advancement of automotive technology requires that our industry has access to leading edge training to keep pace with modern vehicle systems,” said Rob Morrell, Senior Director of Customer Training at Worldpac. “CTI+WTI’s new learning management system enables national accounts and independent shops alike to help attract, retain and grow talent.”
      CTI+WTI have hosted more than 45,000 training events in the organizations’ 20-plus year histories. For more information, visit CTIonline.com or WTIonline.com.
       

       
      About Advance Auto Parts
      Advance Auto Parts, Inc. is a leading automotive aftermarket parts provider that serves both professional installer and do-it-yourself customers. As of July 13, 2019, Advance operated 4,912 stores and 150 Worldpac branches in the United States, Canada, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The Company also serves 1,250 independently owned Carquest branded stores across these locations in addition to Mexico, the Bahamas, Turks and Caicos and British Virgin Islands. Additional information about Advance, including employment opportunities, customer services, and online shopping for parts, accessories and other offerings can be found at www.AdvanceAutoParts.com.
      View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20191101005436/en/
      Source: Advance Auto Parts, Inc.
      Media Relations:
      Darryl Carr
      T: (540) 589-8102
      E: [email protected]
      Investor Relations:
      Elisabeth Eisleben
      T: (919) 227-5466
      E: [email protected]
    • By Jonathan Ganther
      Hey guys. I'm new to the forum and was looking for this subject but couldn't find it. Sorry If I'm posted something that's already been discussed. I own a brake shop in Austin, TX. We do anywhere from 10-20 brake jobs a day. We only do brakes so I don't know how much full service auto shops deal with this problem but... Customers are constantly calling in claiming they've bought the best parts or they want to provide their own parts because they've done research and know what is best. This drives me crazy. First of all they don't know whats best. Then after being told no they get offended and act like tons of shops allow this. What is the best way to handle these customers? Just send them away? I'll quote them a price using our parts and they act as though its a rip off. What shops are doing this for their customers? I feel like I'm letting jobs get away from me. Any experience with this?
    • By DUFRESNES
      Our Service writer is paid 8% on all sales.  When he is off for 2 days, we have another hourly person that service writes.   My question is we pay the SW that was off for 2 days 8% on all sales, but take them as vacation days.  The person filling in (he does a great job) pay him the difference if he was service writing and would be commission.    Looking to see if somebody has a better solution.  If the regular SW is on vacation, I can figure the sales from his last day till he comes back.  That is not a problem
       
    • By autoguy
      What's everyone using and what do you prefer in terms of online parts ordering? Are you using something integrated into your shop software or a standalone website from napa, o'rielly, advance, autozone, or other local or regional parts supplier? What do you like about it?
      Using Napa Prolink and AdvancePro along with worldpac speedial


  • AutoShopOwner Sponsors



×
×
  • Create New...