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Trending in the right direction


Joe Marconi

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2021 started off real slow, with Jan and Feb being the worst months.  March to August were very good, with sales hitting our goals.  September is a little slower than we like it to be, but I feel we are trending in the right direction, with customer coming back to us that we have not seen in over a year. No complaints. Could it be better, of course. But all good and moving forward! 

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