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Are you paying your employees what they deserve?


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One of the thing that has been brought to the forefront during this employee-shortage era, is the fact that we need to increase the pay salaries of the average technician and service advisor.  In my opinion, we need to increase the pay for entry level people also. Other industries have done, we must also. 

If we are to attract quality people and retain who we have employed, we need to address this issue now. 

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