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Joe Marconi

Winter 2020, so far better than expected

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So far for winter 2020, we are having a better than normal season.  This is good news since, late fall sales fell. I am hopeful this will continue. Sales of new cars fell last year, with the average age of cars on the road are at an all time high. Near 12 years.  And the scrappage rate has greatly declined.  

What are you seeing in your area?

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    • By Joe Marconi
      Usually the winter drops off in sales, but along with car counts.  This year is different.  Customers seem consumed with debt and worried about thier finances, and putting off needed vehicle maintenance.  Not good.  In the long run this leads to breakdowns and larger repair bills. 
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