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flacvabeach

Virginia Automotive Association Convention

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The VAA convention is being held April 12-14 at The Main in Norfolk Virginia.  This is always a great show and includes great speakers, great food, and a big automotive trade show.  
Everyone is welcome - you don't have to be a member to join in the fun.  Visit vaauto.org for details and registration.  Join VAA and you get one free registration to the show!

 

2019 Convention Brochure.pdf

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