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Discover The Top 3 Sales Techniques To EXPLODE Profits In Your Auto Repair Shop.

For a lot of shops across the country, we’re heading into the typical ’slow-down’ season that happens every year when the kids head back to school. Aside from focusing on your marketing to boost car count, right now it’s more important than ever to sharpen your sales skills so you can take advantage of each and every opportunity that walks into your shop.

That’s why my business partner Gerry Frank, and renowned sales trainer and coach, Mike Tatich, recently sat down and recorded a new training titled:

"The Top 3 Sales Techniques To EXPLODE Profits In Your Auto Repair Shop"

On this free training, you will learn:

  • Quick and easy sales techniques that can put an extra $1000 a week in your pocket
  • How to book at least one additional high-dollar ticket every day
  • How to sell diagnostics for a PROFIT (and stop giving it away for free!)

Don’t miss this opportunity to discover and put these money-making strategies to work for you in your shop right away!

CLICK TO REGISTER NOW

 

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  • Similar Forum Topics

    • By ScottSpec
      I think we all know that diagnostics is the most costly service we provide in the automotive repair business today. In today's automotive repair environment, you need to be selling diagnostics, and getting paid for it. I'm looking for feedback on when things don't go exactly as planned. 
      Let's say a car comes in and you sell some diagnostics, by the hour, or from a menu. After you complete that work, and you still don't have an answer, do you go back to the customer and sell some more? Do you continue at your expense? If you do go back to the customer, and you have nothing conclusive after that, then what? Do you keep going back and selling more diagnostic work until you solve the problem? If you continue to go back and sell more, how many times can you do that? We've all had that car that we've worked on for weeks to find some strange problem. I doubt many customers are willing to pay for the 40 hours you spent on the car.
      Now lets say after 5 hours of work that the customer agreed to, you are no closer to finding the issue than when the car came in. Do you charge them for the 5 hours and send them down the road even though you have not provided them with a diagnoses? Do you start spending your time trying to solve the issue because you have a hard time charging for 5 hours and are unable to provide any answers?
      I'm asking these questions as I am rethinking my business strategy on diagnostics a little. Our shop is known for its abilities to diagnose problems. We have other shops bringing cars to us on a regular basis because of these abilities. I actually get several calls and emails weekly from across the county for help diagnosing problems. There are times, a lot of times, when I think this is more of a curse, than a blessing. I know we are in the business of fixing cars, and we need to be able to find problems if customers are going to keep coming back. But after my lead tech and I spent a considerable amount of time over the last 15 days diagnosing the strangest intermittent no start issue on an Audi, and watching his frustration grow everyday, not because of the difficulty of the issue as we both love the challenge, but because it held him back from addressing the other work that was coming in the shop. 
      So, as rewarding as it was to solve that mystery, I can't help but look back at what it cost me financially, and the frustration to the technician, and realize we have to come up with a way to try to avoid going down those rabbit holes. Right now my idea is to give it 1 hour. If after an hour, we are not relatively certain that we will find the issue, with another hour or two, then let the car go. Let the customer know that it's not that we can't fix the car, but that we cannot fix it efficiently. If I lose that customer, it would probably still be cheaper that working on his car for 2 weeks.
      Love to hear your thoughts.
      Scott   
         
        
    • By Joe Marconi
      There's a time to work, and there's a time to relax a bit. We are in the middle of a three- day weekend; Labor Day. The very name Labor Day should make us all think about how hard we work all year long.  We need balance in our lives. We need time with friends and family.  So, take a break and recharge your batteries this holiday weekend. It will do you a world of good.  Trust me, the business will be there after the weekend is over. 
      Happy Labor Day Weekend!
       
    • By Savage
      Hello everyone
      I am new to the service side of the retail auto industry having worked in sales for 5 years. I am now the mechanical department manager of a Carstar collision repair shop. In addition to the usual insurance work, I am starting to take on more customer pay repairs. An issue I keep running into is that because I am located in Canada (South Ontario not far from Detroit) many of the vehicles we work on are severely rusted underneath and many bolts have siezed in place. Many require torches, cutting, drilling, and other unusual disassembly of adjacent components to remove. For example right now I am having a starter replaced on a caravan, and the lower engine mount needs to be removed but is siezed. We needed to apply heat but because it is so close to the rad fan shroud, ended up having to remove the shroud and other items nearby just to attempt to heat and remove the bolt. This ultimately didn't work, and we are now cutting it and drilling it out. Often times using heat causes damage to components. We needed to use heat to cut into a suspension knuckle to remove it after it was damaged from a curb, and ended up destroying a wheel bearing. Abs sensors also commonly need to be snapped off and drilled out because they are just so fused in place. Obviously this gets expensive. 
       
      This happens all the time, and as a result the times I am using from shopkey pro and mitchell are not reflective of how long these jobs actually take. On one hand I don't feel it is fair to the customer to charge 2.6 hours for the starter replacement, and another 3 hours to attempting multiple ways to get a bolt out, heating, removing adjacent components, fan shroud R+I... turning a 2.6 hour job into 5.6 hours. On the other hand I understand that this is just the reality of working on vehicles older than a couple years in this part of the country and the customer should be paying for it. 
       
      What would you consider standard practice in this situation? I don't want to be eating all this extra time, but I also don't want to have to charge customer hours upon hours additionally because we have to figure out how to unsieze everything.  
       
       
    • By Gonzo
      Battin' a Thousand   The batter steps up to the plate, takes a hand full of dirt  and rubs his hands and the bat.  He takes a few scrapes with  his feet from the batter’s box while digging in with his cleats.   He then gives the pitcher the evil eye and sets his bat ready  to take whatever the pitcher is going to throw at him. The  catcher gives the signs, the pitcher nods his head.  He takes  a quick look to first base makes his wind up and then lets the  ball fly to home plate.  The batter takes a swing... “Pop” the  ball is in the catcher’s glove.     “Steee---rike!!!” yells the umpire.   Somewhere there is an announcer telling the crowd the  count while a statistician is writing down the results of the  pitch, and calculating the batter's average. With baseball if  you can manage to get a hit 5 out of 10 times you’re up to bat…  you’re doing outstanding.  Achieving a perfect hitting record  on the other hand, may never happen in baseball, but in the  auto repair business (and most every other field of play)  batting a thousand is not a goal it's a requirement.   Every job that comes into the service bay is another attempt at keeping that perfect score.  Come-backs, bad diagnosis, faulty parts and the like are not what any service person wants to deal with.  To keep that perfect score going you have to overcome those obstacles and get the job done right before sending the customer’s car around the bases.  Unlike the highly paid professional ball player who is never going to achieve that perfect score the highly trained mechanic has to knock it out of the park each and every time.   There's a lot of talk in the industry about how some service advisers/writers and shop owners want a quick “off the cuff” diagnosis and repair rather than waiting for the results of a lengthy-time consuming diagnostic procedure.  A mechanic may have a general idea of what is wrong but it still takes proper testing to determine the correct course of action to make the repair.  I don't know where this idea came from that every mechanic has the correct answer to ever problem simply by listening to the description given to them by the customer or service writer.  It's not like we (mechanics) know what kind of pitch is being hurled at us each and every time.     I'm sure the pro ball player could “up” his stats if he knew exactly what kind of pitch was coming across the plate.  As it is, he has to make a quick decision, make the right swing, and make contact.  In the repair world, analyzing the pitch is the key to a successful outcome.  Diagnostics is what makes the difference.  Especially on today's vehicles with their interconnected systems, multi-layered computer controls, and the occasional “oops” from a previous botched repair, these all have to be sorted out before the repair is made.  This takes time, diagnostics takes time, and time is money.      When I hear that a shop isn't charging for diagnostic time it tells me they are either under estimating the value of proper diagnostics or believe they are good enough to read the catcher’s signals and in some way already know what pitch is being thrown.  Taking a couple of swings at a repair and not diagnosing anything is like standing in the batter’s box blindfolded.  I'd call that a foul ball waiting to happen for sure.    It’s important to examine a problem, diagnose as needed and not swing at every pitch that you’re given. In the long run, from the consumers standpoint, a shop that takes the time to diagnose a vehicle correctly may sound more expensive at first when you walk up to the service counter, but chances are you won’t be picked off at 2nd base because you have to spend more cash, buy even more parts that you probably didn’t need, while trying to solve the problem at those shops that don’t see a need in proper diagnostic time.    A new player entered the field; it was a job from one of the body shops I do business with. This 2013 Ford Escape was almost ready to go home, however the air bag light wouldn't go off.  That's when I was called to plate.    “We can sell this job today if you can get this taken care of.  We’ve struck out so far,” the owner of the body shop told me.     “I’ll see what I can do,” I told him.    The first thing I did was check out what codes were in the system.  There was only one code.  B0095-11 (Right front impact sensor fault – sub code “shorted to ground”).  Since it was in a front collision I took my first swing up to bat by checking to see if the wires were smashed or cut.  Strike one... the wires are fine, wrong colors though, need to check that a little further.  OK, let's try something else... is the connector damaged or the sensor itself in anyway a problem.  Strike two... now this is getting serious.  Did the module fail?  Is there more to this story?  Where's the next pitch coming from?   A little more snooping around and a bit more in-depth studying of the wiring diagram I think I've got the answer.  Very close to the impact sensor is another sensor with the exact same type of connector.  The real tell-tale was the wire colors.  It looks like when they put the car back together they inadvertently switched the two connectors.  (Pretty dumb to have the same type of connectors so close together under the hood... but it ain't the first time I've seen a curve ball like this.) I switched the leads and then went back into the system to clear the code.  (With most of these newer systems you not only have to clear the code but you also have to “reboot” the computer by turning the key off before attempting the next “at-bat”.)   Well, this batter is ready, the catcher has thrown down the sign, the computers and connections on the playing field are ready to go.  All that's left is the pitch.  I turned the key and the pitch is on its way. The warning lights come on, the air bag light stayed on for its required amount of time and then.... went off.  No codes present and the rest of the systems checked out fine.  Yep, I took my swing, and it’s a long, long high flyer… it looks like…yes… yes it is… it’s a “HOME RUN!”     Here's a perfect example of the diagnostics taking longer than the actual repair.  The way I see it, diagnostic is the mechanics swing at bat, and it's just as important as the actual repair.  After spending the time to research a problem only to find out that it was a simple connector doesn’t diminish the time already spent to find out it was just a connector.    Mechanics get paid to fix a car, that’s what we do, diagnosing a problem is part of it, and good diagnostic work will keep ya battin’ a thousand. 
      View full article
    • By carmcapriotto
      How To Sell Diagnostics at a Profit?
      This is not an easy question to answer. Service professionals must be paid for their expertise because the cost of doing diagnostics is the most expensive service you have in your building.  LISTEN HERE.
      It is time to move from diagnostics to testing and analyzing. Every shop needs to build a premium product around testing and analyzing. You need to be known as the ‘we can fix anything right the first time shop’. Your motto: “We have the best technicians.” Your shops testing and analyzing skills is the premium product you sell and are known for in your marketplace. No need to go anywhere else. We do the research, test, analyze and discover what is wrong. We present the solution then you decide.
      Marketing this premium product requires a strong testing/analyzing process that both the service advisor and technician are totally in agreement with. The benefits allow the SA to confidently sell testing and analyzing.
      The diagnostician knows that the SA will sell the value and benefits to the customer because the process dictates the work to be done. A very strong discussion and powerful take-a-ways that will arrest the black hole in your business of profitable diagnostic time. 
       
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