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Not every shop pays flat rat; for many reasons.  So, many techs are on hourly pay.  There is nothing wrong with hourly pay, as long as you have an incentive program in place that promotes high production levels to avoid complacency.  For hourly paid employees I strongly urge you to have a pay plan that rewards production levels on a sliding scale.  

As a business coach, I have seen too many times shops with low production levels and high tech payroll due to overtime pay. Overtime pay must not be used to get the jobs done with no regard to labor production.  Limit overtime and create a strategy that increases production and rewards techs with production bonuses.  By the way, there are many ways to incentivize techs, it's not all about money. 

Overtime without high levels of production will eat into profits and if not controlled, with kill your business. 

If your shop is an hourly paid shop, what incentives do you have in place to maintain production levels? 

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