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Article: If You Think Your Shop is a Business, This Article May Surprise You

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I feel the need to say thank you! After reviewing the financials for this past year I was quite depressed. I did $100,000 more business than the year before, but hardly any more profit to show for it. I had personally been stressed out, buisy beyond belief, and just plain beat up this past year, and for what... a small profit??? Yes I did profit more than the year before, but put it this way - not impressive. One night I tuned to Auto Shop Owners for a little help and guidence. Threre was a TON of helpfull posts, and some real eye openers. The one post that was burned into my brain was a post about running a business vs. running a repair shop. I told myself it was time to run a BUSINESS not just a AUTO REPAIR SHOP. I had a BIG meeting with my guys, telling them its time they stepped up there game and helped me "bear" some of weight I was carrying around with this business. I raised prices $5 per hour. I started charging for diagnosis. I started tracking the techs billed hours (I pay hourly) and created a bonus program for them. I actually started "watching and analyzing the numbers" rather just going off of feel.

The results.... Utterly amazing. This year (Jan and Feb) I have profited almost twice as much as last year. I know!!! that is crazy. Just goes to show what a little "thinking" can do. I remind myself everyday to treat my shop as a business, not a "repair shop". I hope this helps others, it sure helped me. Hopefully this trend continues for me, but again THANK YOU to my fellow shop owners for posting your knowlegde and advise!!!

 

Sent from my Chromebook 11 Model 3180 using Tapatalk

 

 

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