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How many of you have a four bay shop ?

If you do how many techs do you have ?

What is your average sales weekly , monthly ?

What do you spend in advertising ?

What was your sales in 2017 ?

I am using this shop as a guide for those who would like to follow and see real time progress.

For those interested just answer the questions so you and I can see what your strong points and if and where you may have areas for improvement.   

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      As a young tech, there wasn’t anything I couldn’t do. I diagnosed every car with the accuracy and skill of a Greek god. My efficiency week after week was over 150 percent, and with no comebacks. As a shop owner, I sold every job, and at a profit. Each new day was better than the day before. Boy, when I look back, I was amazing. Those were days.
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      I often forget how young some of my employees are. I also need to remember that people will make mistakes and they need the time to hone their skills through years of experience. They don’t have the gray hair of knowledge that often comes with decades of experience.
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    • By Stevens Automotive Service
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      Charging for Diagnostic time... Absolutely and is easy done. 
      Fleet Customers.. Absolutely if you have the man power and shop to handle them. Be careful , you can loose them if your not equipped to support the amount of work. Do your homework.
      Damage and misfortune to a customers vehicle while in your care... If it's your fault just fix it. If not assess and address it quickly, the sooner the better. 
      Know your Business not just part of it... Know it inside and out. Knowing your fixed cost is a must. 
      Spend Wisely ..It takes money to make money keep it balanced , don't invest without returns.
      Advertise Wisely....Quick example : If you are around a large place of business where people work , Hospital, Shopping Mall, Manufacturing Plant Etc there are just a few suggestions of gaining customers for next to nothing cost, to attain those customers. A promotion on a business size card and NO, you don't have to discount a thing. 
      Dealing with employees ..On cell phones , drugs etc whatever you don't address you condone!  
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      Dan Stevens 
      Stevens Automotive Services  
         
    • By Stevens Automotive Service
      If you have ever thought about shop management and training for your business now is the time. Make 2018 profitable and with a lot less stress. 
      For ASO members that are serious about business and becoming the shop of choice in your area then lets get started.
      Business coaching and training for your auto repair business. Real world one on one training for your business as all shops are different with different needs and markets. 
      Cost is 100.00 a week for a 1 year program for serious owners only that want to build a business. 
      Contact me for details and make 2018 all it can be. 
      Email [email protected]
      Website http://stevensauto.shop/
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      I hope that everyone is having a good 2017 and as we all know time goes very quickly!
      The new year is fast approaching and changes are coming this year in many ways to the business.
      I have talked to many of you and I just want to say there are some great people on this site. 
      For those of you who are running your business to its full potential keep it up , build towards that retirement, spend time with family ENJOY !  
      If you need help it is only a PM, email, text or a phone call away so you can do the same. 
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      What was your best business move in 2017 where you seen a upward move in profit?  
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