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Shopcat

Do You Have Many Female Customers?

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There is an ever increasing percentage of women that are decision makers in where the family funster goes for repairs. The Automotive Aftermarket Industry Association discovered in a recent study, almost 90% of women are now involved in the decision process for their vehicle’s repair and maintenance, 68% of them take the vehicle to the shop themselves, 45% are solely responsible for their auto repair and service decisions.  That is amazing.  Do you have 60% or 70% female clients? What do you do to adapt to this changing dynamic?

 

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