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Hello Everyone,

 

Does anyone have any experience in installing Rainguard wiper blades and as to their quality? They say they are made by Trico, but that doesn't mean much if the quality isn't good.

I'm thinking about getting a large stock of them.

 

Thanks in advance

 

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