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2017 SUCCESS THREAD - Little disciplines makes great success.

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  • Similar Forum Topics

    • Free Simple Shop Management Software

      Hey Everyone, I'm Ricardo from Complete Auto Reports.  You may have heard about the shop management software that we made at a shop in Linden NJ.  We've been really busy over the last year trying to refine the process at a shop through the software.  We have come up with something we think that people can and will benefit from.  We want to start with smaller auto repair facilities who are looking for something to transition out of paper and pen, as well as word documents and/or excel spreadsheets.   We've taken our software and made a free package that allows the following from any device with a updated and functional browser: Take appointments from your customers Digital Vehicle Inspections - Included in every service request and sent to each customer if performed Workflow - Pending, Under Process, Awaiting Approval, Approval Completed, Work In Progress, Completed Ratings - Customers can communicate ratings directly to you Messages - You can communicate with customers through the platform Customer App - All service history available, can schedule appointments with the app, transfer vehicle records to new owners Sales Reports 100% mobile - Works on everything from your 5inch iPhone to your desktop.  You can presently upload all of your customer information: name, address, phone numbers, email. Paid for versions offer parts ordering through PartsTech.com and Employeement modules that track employee time on jobs. Are there members here who are interested in trying the free platform to see if it's a fit for their business? Anyone interested in the paid for versions, can also get 60 days of free use and discounted rates available from our SEMA promotions.

      By CAR_AutoReports, in Management Software, Web Sites & Internet

      • 0 replies
      • 137 views
    • What tools have made a positive impact in your shop?

      Hi there!

      My name is Kiley and I write for "The Return" in Ratchet+Wrench magazine. (For those unfamiliar, 'The Return' is more of a personalized review that gives readers the chance to learn about how a product works inside a shop that uses it as well as the shop's review of the product.) 

      My question to you all today is this: what tool has made an impact in your shop? If someone was looking for a product to add to their shop, what would you recommend?  (This can range from shop floor tools, security systems, management systems, payroll, etc.)  Thank you so much and have a great day! 

      By ratchetandwrench, in Automotive Shop Tools & Equipment

      • 4 replies
      • 484 views
    • Article: Poke It With A Sharp Stick - car repair is so simple...even a cave man can do it (NOT!)

      Poking it with a Sharp Stick         It's not so much that I work with the general  public in my daily business, it's more of what  kind of 'public' gives me the business.  I'm not  talking about people who can think and reason  like most educated, knowledgeable people.  It's  that ever present cave man mentality.  You know the type, the guy who's elevator doesn't go to the top floor, or the couple who can't seem to keep both oars in the water.  The all seem to lack one simple characteristic, common sense.  The very quality that every halfwit adventure I've either seen, (or been a part of) have in common.  (I can't leave myself out of this one... guilty as charged)         It stands to reason if some of these mental giants were among the intrepid pioneers who crossed the great divide in a Conestoga wagon, they probably would be the ones that never made it. But, with so many modern conveniences like diet, clean water, and modern medical care, these half-wit trail blazers roam freely throughout every part of the countryside.           There was a comedian some years ago who told a story about his ancestors from the Stone Age.  He commented on how some people felt it necessary to leave the safety of the cave to take on some huge beast with nothing more than a sharpened stick, only to be trampled to death by the same prehistoric behemoth.  He went on to say, “My relatives were the ones who stayed in the cave... how else can explain my being here?!  If my ancestors were the ones who got killed off, how would it be possible for me to be standing here telling you all about them? My relatives had the good sense to stay out of harm’s way.  Were my ancestors brave? Sure they’re brave, they’re just not stupid.”            “Oh look, large man eating beast outside the cave, I’ll stay here… you can go out there.  I’ve gotta sharpen my stick, and while you’re gone I'll paint your picture on these cave walls. Our ancestors will think you’re great hunters that way.”  (“Right, when in fact they’re running for your lives…!”)  Funny, yes, true... I guess so, and in similar ways, it’s how some people tackle car repair.            In most states there’s no regulation to keep someone from poking their pointed stick under the hood of their car, or hanging a shingle on a shop door and call themselves a “mechanic”.  The unsuspecting consumer is at the mercy of the phone book (and other sources) to find a shop that can actually make the appropriate repairs on their car.  It's like the car has turned into a huge mammoth, and the person attempting the repair is just taking stabs at it with a sharp stick.  No training, no experience, and more than likely no clue what they are doing.  This is but one of the many reasons why the automotive field gets such low marks in the consumers’ eyes.  As one of my customers told me, “It's getting harder and harder to find a good mechanic these days”.  And, from what I can tell, it hasn’t been much better in previous decades either.          A typical example of this was last week.  An older gentleman came into the shop with an air conditioning problem on his 1967 Thunderbird.  Sweet ride, entirely original... just the way he liked it.  He had been to several shops trying to get the air conditioning working.  This car was factory equipped with the old style compressor and A/C lines that didn't use a Schrader valve, but instead had the hand shut off valves that you moved (in the correct direction) to recharge or change the compressor.  The owner’s story was that every place he went to, no one knew how to use the hand valves correctly to refill the system.  They were all good at replacing parts, but had no clue as to how the system worked.    I'm old enough to have worked on these when they were very common.   All the previous shops could have figured out how they operated, if they would have just put down their pointy stick, and did a little research.  (FYI - There's only 3 positions to be concerned about: Front seated blocks off the compressor, Mid-position is used to allow flow between entire system, compressor, and the gauge port, and the most important one, back seated, which allows the entire system to work normally.)          Turned into an easy job for me; all in all, the A/C system was blowing cold air in no time.  All it took was a little basic knowledge rather than guessing at it. (No telling what parts actually needed replaced, by the time I saw the car everything was new, oiled, and mounted correctly.)  Too bad for the owner though, he paid each and every one of them to do what I just did... make cold air. The T-bird owner was overjoyed to finally have his air conditioning back in working order.  (He did tell me he wasn't about to use those other guys ever again.)  I guess after so many pokes with that sharp stick the T-Bird owner had had enough.           Then there’s the DIY'r trying to repair the car in the family cave.   First it’s a jab with the pointed end of their stick, then two, then another, until they either figure it out, or they find the information they need to make the repairs.  There's been a lot of talk lately about the factory information not being available... really??  What Neanderthal told you that?   I've been working professionally in the car repair business for a long time and I've never had any problem obtaining factory information. The hard part is getting the right scanners (at reasonable prices) and education these days.  It's out there; it just may take a little poking around to find it. (Pun intended)  The big thing is, it’s not free, never has been.  Poking the sharp end of your stick at the manufacturer and expecting him to roll over like a wounded mammoth and hand you the information for free … just ain't happening… ever.          I have this mental image of a DIY'r and their protégé the “untrained mechanic” as the cave men portrayed in the painting with the great mammoth in center.  The cave men are throwing their spears into the beast, but the huge behemoth of prehistoric times still isn't quite finished off.   It's not a futile effort, if they keep stabbing at it they’ll eventually get the job done.  Gee, doesn’t that sound just like a couple of guys trying to figure out what’s wrong with the car by throwing part after part at it?  It does to me.            Poking around with that Stone Age sharpened stick method of diagnostics is a slow and unproductive way of making any kind of automotive repair. But, I still see the same kind of poor workmanship even today.  Working on modern cars, and even one from a few decades ago requires the right tools, the right information, and some good old fashion common sense.  If you’ve got all that, you’ve got half the battle won.  That common sense and good repair practices goes a long way. One thing’s for sure… it beats poking it with a sharp stick.  
      View full article

      By Gonzo, in AutoShopOwner Articles

      • 2 replies
      • 96 views
    • Happy July 4th!

      On July 4, 1776, the thirteen colonies claimed their independence from England, an event which eventually led to the formation of the United States. Each year on July 4th, also known as Independence Day, Americans celebrate this historic event.  Let's all celebrate this day and remeber that we live in the great nation on the planet! 

      By Joe Marconi, in AutoShopOwner Announcements

      • 1 reply
      • 189 views
    • Happy Mother’s Day to all our Mothers and Wives

      Let me share a great story. The year was 1820 and Peter Richley was a grateful man. He had survived one of the strangest and most harrowing events known to mankind. The ship which he had been traveling on sank. He was rescued. By some strange twist of circumstance, however, this ship sank. He was rescued again. But, this third ship sank likewise. He was rescued for a third time. Yet, his fourth ship of passage soon sank. And unbelievably, he was rescued for a fourth time, but this fifth ship sank as well. It would have been laughable had it not been so serious. On the high seas, however, he floated with the serene confidence that somehow God did not want him to die. And sure enough, as if on cue, another ship came by and answered his call for help. This ocean liner, The City of Leeds, was named after it’s British city of orgin. It was bound from England to Australia and traveled the same sea lane as Peter Richley’s downed ships. The crew of The City of Leeds hoisted Peter aboard. Dry clothing was provided to Peter. The ship’s doctor gave him a cursory exam, pronounced him fit, and then asked an unusual favor. “There’s a lady on board who booked passage to Australia,” the doctor explained. “She’s looking for her son who disappeared years ago. She’s dying and she’s asking to see her son. She knows everybody on board and since you’re the only newcomer, would you pretend to be her son?” Peter agreed. After all, his life had now been saved for the fifth time. He followed the doctor below deck and entered into a cabin. There on a small bed lay a frail woman with silvered-hair. She was obviously suffering from a very high fever. Deliriously, she was crying out. “Please God. Let me see my son before I die. I must see my son!” The ship’s doctor gently pushed the young man toward the bed. Soon, however, Peter Richley began sobbing. For lying there on that bed was the reason that he couldn’t seem to die. Here was the lifeline that had kept him from drowning five times. For lying on that bed was none other than Sarah Richley—who had prayed for ten years to reconciled to her son, Peter. The ship’s doctor stood in amazement as the young man fell down by the bed and embraced the sick woman. “I’m here mom! I’m here. It’s me!” Within days the fever had subsided and his mother awakened to find an answered prayer seated on the edge of her bed. (This story was told by western writer Louis L’Amour in an interview he gave. This story bears out the saying, “truth is stranger than fiction.” In researching the Louis L’Amour website there were additional references that bear out this story to be a true story.)

      By xrac, in Outside The Shop

      • 0 replies
      • 240 views
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