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PAPShop

U Haul Dealership - Good Idea?

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The "in town" U Haul dealership went out of business - their other business, not the U Haul part - and we have been approached to take it over.

 

Is anyone else an independent U Haul dealership?

 

Pros and cons? We are in doing due diligence and researching everything about it.

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