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  • Similar Forum Topics

    • By Joe Marconi
      We know the value of technical and sales training, but what about in-house training.  What I am referring to is review policies and procedures.  By reviewing in house written procedures gets everyone on the same page, improves production and also improves quality in the repair process. A simple process such as everyone following the same procedure for a cooling system problem will add to the overall shop's production and in the long run procedure a better quality job.     
    • By Joe Marconi
      Not every shop pays flat rat; for many reasons.  So, many techs are on hourly pay.  There is nothing wrong with hourly pay, as long as you have an incentive program in place that promotes high production levels to avoid complacency.  For hourly paid employees I strongly urge you to have a pay plan that rewards production levels on a sliding scale.  
      As a business coach, I have seen too many times shops with low production levels and high tech payroll due to overtime pay. Overtime pay must not be used to get the jobs done with no regard to labor production.  Limit overtime and create a strategy that increases production and rewards techs with production bonuses.  By the way, there are many ways to incentivize techs, it's not all about money. 
      Overtime without high levels of production will eat into profits and if not controlled, with kill your business. 
      If your shop is an hourly paid shop, what incentives do you have in place to maintain production levels? 
    • By Joe Marconi
      Shop production is a hot topic these days.  High production results in higher sales and profits.  But there seems to be so many obstacles to overcome to achieve high production levels.  
      I was discussing production with a few shop owners, and one shop owner mentioned that he recently hired a shop foreman; an “A” tech in his early 50’s.  The foreman uses his knowledge and skills to organize the work flow.  For younger techs, it’s even more important that they know how to work and keep productive.
      What are your thoughts?   Does anyone else have a foreman or similar position?  And how does this role affect production?
       
    • By Hands On
      I need to find some employees fast and I am having no luck, anyone willing to help me write an advertisement or help me with postings, over the phone or through e-mail, please let me know.
      Just found this, not feeling good about this.
      https://www.indeed.com/forum/job/automotive-technician/can-t-do-it-anymore/t459836
    • By Ron Ipach
      I released a video on my blog yesterday that seems to be causing a bit of a stir. Some shop owners are saying my idea is brilliant - others say I'm totally wrong.
      In a nutshell, I'm advocating giving away $100 in services for a new client referral.
      The last thing I want to do is give away bad information, so I'm asking for some help to set me straight if I'm way off base.
      You can watch the video here for my full explaination: http://www.captaincarcount.com/auto-repair-marketing/is-this-a-crazy-idea-or-what/
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